Stockport band Blossoms have achieved phenomenal international success, but they always remember their roots.

The video for their single Honey Sweet was filmed around their old stomping ground , and last year the band released their debut album at a special homecoming gig at midnight at the Stockport Plaza.

And now the five-piece are returning to Stockport, this time to Heaton Moor, to play a very special acoustic gig.

Celebrating the launch of band member Tom Ogden’s new behind-the-scenes documentary about their tour, Blossoms will be premiering their new film exclusively at small independent cinema The Savoy.

“It’s a great local cinema, it has cool Art Deco inspired interior and its intimate which is something we wanted it to be,” says Tom.


The film will reveal some of the best unseen parts of the band’s recent tour in America, he explains.

“I committed to filming everything we did so there was lots that didn’t make the cut, the first edit of the film was two hours long!

“I’ve had an interest in making films since I was about 14, I used to make short films with my mates in them, I’d film and edit them.

“Obviously since the band started I haven’t found much time to make any films, so since we had a three week tour in the USA I thought it was a great opportunity to make one about the band. I had the idea the week before we went away, so I got a Canon 700d DSLR camera with a couple of lenses and that was it.

“I started out making daft short films with my mates, then made a series called Round Are Way and it got popular amongst everyone at high school and we’d have a new episode for the start of the week.

“Then I was going to pursue it properly until the band started really. I’d like to keep making them definitely, it’s another big passion of mine, we made the Honey Sweet music video ourselves and some of the earlier ones.”

But did the lack of privacy get on anyone’s nerves? Not according to Tom: “The lads were all cool with me filming them. They knew for what I wanted it to look like, they’d need to be filmed all the time.”

Speaking about his favourite part of the film, Tom adds: “There’s a scene in Kansas City where Myles wants to shoot a gun, so we get in a Uber and the driver turns out to be an expert in guns and helps us get all the ‘safety training’ in place, it’s like something from a Louis Theroux documentary.

The Savoy Cinema

The lads will be there on the first two nights of the screening – Friday August 11 and Saturday August 12 – ready to play a special acoustic set to fans after the film. Unfortunately tickets for these two dates have sold out, but extra dates have been added with just the film on August 31, September 2, September 3 and September 6.

Tickets are priced at standard £7.50; concessions £6.00 (over 60/in education); luxury £9.00; sofa for two £18.00 – call 0161 432 2114 to book. Telephone bookings can be made from 4:00pm on week days, 1:00pm on Wednesdays and Saturdays, times will vary on Sundays.

Last week I was in the Western Isles, the land of my father. There’s something mystical about the isles and they call out to those with roots there, as well as to others who discover them.

Like many, my father was born there but brought up elsewhere. However, it was the island he considered he came from, not the village in the shadow of a central Scotland pit that he grew up in.

In that he wasn’t alone, as the islands, as with other rural parts of Scotland, catch hold of their emigrant sons and daughters; and keep hold of their descendants. Whether they now live in a tenement flat in a city or a house in a small town, the call of the land is heard and more often heeded than ignored.

There’s a pride in the natural beauty of both mainland and island Scotland but also a deep-rooted pain felt in its history.

The land issue is burned deep in the soul of every Scot, an innate belief that an injustice occurred and that what was our ancestors’ birthright was stolen from them. The look-but-don’t-touch situation that existed in many parts of Scotland enraged those who wanted to wander the lands of their forebears, but were excluded.

Salt was rubbed in the wound when many of those lording over their manor or estate were absentee landlords with either little relationship with the land or dubious title to it. Robber barons, as the late great Tom Johnston described them, and as the Green MSP Andy Wightman has written, the poor had no lawyers.

Compounding that was the knowledge that some were cleared from their native land and forced to find shelter across the seas. It’s been written about extensively and eloquently from John Prebble to Jim Hunter and still angers to this day. The visions of destitution and pain are etched in the collective history of the Scots. It has affected other nations as emigrant Scots have carried it with them to their new homes.

John McKenzie, the radical lands minister in New Zealand at the end of the 19th century, broke up large estates to form that nation of small farmers that in many ways still exists today.

That was done largely down to the misery he had seen inflicted when growing up in Alness and streams of Highlanders cleared from Sutherland made their way to the coast, to depart from the land of their birth. He vowed to ensure that those sins wouldn’t be inflicted in his new home.

Many of the wild glens we see now were far from wildernesses in previous times. But the people and their cattle were moved for sheep or sporting estates, and the very nature of the terrain has changed.

It may be years ago, but the hurt is felt down through the generations and injustices continue, as young people are unable to obtain a house in their native village, never mind land on the ground they’ve grown up upon. Some of it is historical fact, other aspects are mythology, but all create a cocktail that is imbibed by most Scots and leaves a bitter taste to this day.

Scotland isn’t alone in that collective history that can become partly mythology. And while some aspects rightly needed challenged or corrected, the story is important all the same.

The Irish have the great famine and their forced emigration, especially to the USA. Generations have seared in their very soul as a consequence. It partly defines their relationship with Britain, given the deliberate cruelty of it, even if it was more due to incompetence than deliberate policy. But, it also drives huge contributions to famines elsewhere around the globe, from generations who’ve never known hunger but feel it gnawing in their genes.

The USA has the frontier spirit. It’s imbued by all irrespective of where the new immigrants have come from or when they arrived. Generations that blazed a trail or rode in a wagon moulded a society and left a legacy that lingers to this day, in 
attitudes to guns and the welfare state.

I recall the village my grandparents grew up in, which was next to some of the best salmon waters in Europe and yet access was denied as they neither had title to the lands they’d grown up in or the wherewithal to meet the significant charges imposed by latter day owners.

Lewis became the fiefdom of James Matheson, who had made his money in the Far East and partly through opium. As Justice Secretary, I recall meeting my Chinese counterpart and both apologising for Matheson’s actions and noting that if it occurred today, the land would be confiscated under Proceeds of Crime legislation. Instead families were cleared and the land has been sold on many times since.

The Land Raiders that sought to fight back are now at long last remembered with memorials. But the bitterness remains. I recall my grandmother, a very kind and Christian lady, being scathing about those who owned the land and waters that she and her people were restricted from.

Of course, progress has been made in access and credit goes to several recent administrations of different political hues. But it’s both long overdue and still doesn’t go far enough. When the Scottish Parliament reconvenes after the summer recess it will continue what seems almost a perennial debate about how to try and right that wrong, when so many years have passed and so many different owners have acquired the land.

It’s complex as the land has been sold on, and the world in which we live has changed. But, further action is needed to assuage the collective pain and repay a historic debt etched deep in the Scottish soul.

H.L. Mencken once said, “Laws are no longer made by a rational process of public discussion; they are made by a process of blackmail and intimidation, and they are executed in the same manner.”

Let’s not mince words. U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, the nation’s top law enforcement official, would not recognize the U.S. Constitution if he ran right smack into it.

Whether the head of the Trump administration’s Justice Department enjoys being the architect of a police state or is just painfully, criminally clueless, Sessions has done a great job thus far of sidestepping the Constitution at every turn.

Most recently, under the guise of “fighting crime,” Sessions gave police the green light to rob, pilfer, steal, thieve, swipe, purloin, filch and liberate American taxpayers of even more of their hard-earned valuables (especially if it happens to be significant amounts of cash) using any means, fair or foul.

In this case, the foul method favored by Sessions, and others, is civil asset forfeiture, which allows police and prosecutors to “seize your car or other property, sell it and use the proceeds to fund agency budgets—all without so much as charging you with a crime.”

Under a federal equitable sharing program, police turn asset forfeiture cases over to federal agents who process seizures and then return 80 percent of the proceeds to the police. (In Michigan, police actually get to keep up to 100 percent of forfeited property.)

This incentive-driven excuse for stealing from the citizenry is more accurately referred to as “policing for profit” or “theft by cop.”

Despite the fact that 80 percent of these asset forfeiture cases result in no charge against the property owner, challenging these “takings” in court can cost the owner more than the value of the confiscated property itself. As a result, most property owners either give up the fight or chalk the confiscation up to government corruption, leaving the police and other government officials to reap the benefits. And do they reap the benefits.

Police agencies have used their ill-gotten gains “to buy guns, armored cars and electronic surveillance gear,” reports The Washington Post. “They have also spent money on luxury vehicles, travel and a clown named Sparkles.”

Incredibly, these asset forfeiture scams have become so profitable for the government that, according to The Washington Post, “in 2014, law enforcement took more stuff from people than burglars did.”

In 2015, the federal government seized nearly $2.6 billion worth of airplanes, houses, cash, jewelry, cars and other items under the guise of civil asset forfeiture.

According to USA Today, “Anecdotal evidence suggests that allowing departments to keep forfeiture proceeds may tempt them to use the funds unwisely. For example, consider a 2015 scandal in Romulus, Michigan, where police officers used funds forfeited from illicit drug and prostitution stings to pay for . . .  illicit drugs and prostitutes.”

Memo to the rest of my fellow indentured servants who are living through this dark era of government corruption, incompetence, and general ineptitude: this is not how justice in America is supposed to work.

We are now ruled by a government so consumed with squeezing every last penny out of the population that they are completely unconcerned if essential freedoms are trampled in the process.

Our freedoms aren’t just being trampled, however. They’re being eviscerated.

At every turn, We the People are getting swindled, cheated, conned, robbed, raided, pickpocketed, mugged, deceived, defrauded, double-crossed and fleeced by governmental and corporate shareholders of the American police state out to make a profit at taxpayer expense.

Americans no longer have to be guilty to be stripped of their property, rights and liberties. All you have to be is in possession of something the government wants. And if you happen to have something the government wants badly enough, trust me, their agents will go to any lengths to get it.

If the government can arbitrarily freeze, seize or lay claim to your property (money, land or possessions) under government asset forfeiture schemes, you have no true rights.

Here’s how the whole ugly business works in a nutshell.

First, government agents (usually the police) use a broad array of tactics to profile, identify, target and arrange to encounter (in a traffic stop, on a train, in an airport, in public, or on private property) those individuals who might be traveling with a significant amount of cash or possess property of value. Second, these government agents — empowered by the courts and the legislatures — seize private property (cash, jewelry, cars, homes and other valuables) they “suspect” may be connected to criminal activity.

Then — and here’s the kicker — whether or not any crime is actually proven to have taken place, without any charges being levied against the property owner, or any real due process afforded the unlucky victim, the property is seized by the government, which often divvies it up with the local police who helped with the initial seizure.

In a Kafkaesque turn of the screw, the burden of proof falls on the unfortunate citizenry who must mount a long, complicated, expensive legal campaign to prove their innocence in order to persuade the government that it should return the funds they stole. Not surprisingly, very few funds ever get returned.

It’s a new, twisted form of guilt by association, only it’s not the citizenry being accused of wrongdoing, just their money.

Unsurprisingly, these asset forfeiture scams have become so profitable for the government that they have expanded their reach beyond the nation’s highways.

Any American unwise enough to travel with cash is now fair game for government pickpockets who are out to rob you of your cold, hard cash.

This is not freedom.

As I make clear in my book “Battlefield America: The War on the American People,” if the government can just take from you what they want, when they want, and then use it however they want, you can’t claim to be anything more than a serf in a land they think of as theirs.

It’s up to us to demand reform. These injustices will continue as long as we remain silent.

In other words, make them hear you.

And if they won’t listen, then I suggest it’s time for what Martin Luther King Jr. called for when government doesn’t listen: “militant nonviolent resistance.”

Constitutional attorney and author John W. Whitehead is founder and president of The Rutherford Institute. His book “Battlefield America: The War on the American People” is available online. Information about The Rutherford Institute is available at www.rutherford.org. To read more of his reports — Click Here Now.

Gamers, prepare to get your geek on as the ultimate video games exhibition opens at Manchester’s Museum of Science and Industry.

Power UP! will celebrate more than 40 years of gaming, from Pong and Pac Man to Mario and Minecraft, with more than 160 consoles to play on.

The hands-on, interactive event will feature gaming collections from the likes of Disney, including Mickey Mouse quest Castle of Illusion, and LEGO, as well as driving games like Micro Machines and Project Gotham Racing and fighting titles such as Super Street Fighter II Turbo and Marvel vs Capcom 2.

Visitors can also go head to head with multiplayer classics such as Goldeneye, Mario Kart 8 and Minecraft, and immerse themselves in the world of virtual reality.

The latest big releases like Tekken 7 and Splatoon 2 will also be available to play, alongside arcade classics on special bartop machines such as Metal Slug, Frogger and the Street Fighter series.

You can check out ALL the games coming to the exhibition below.

Power UP! is coming to Manchester’s Museum of Science and Industry

Kids’ activity workshops will also be running throughout the exhibition, where seven to 14-year-olds can learn to compose their own 8-bit game tune or create a BBC Basic character.

The family-friendly exhibition – previously known as Play It – opens at the Museum of Science and Industry on August 11 and runs until August 28.

Tickets start from £5 for 90 minute sessions, which will run daily at 10.15am, 12 noon, 1.45pm and 3.30pm. Half day passes and family tickets are also available.

Adult-only evening events will also take place on August 18 and 25, from 7pm to 10pm, priced at £10, featuring an additional selection of games from the horror, fighting, action, zombies, open world, gangster and FPS genres.

Expect to see games from series such as Doom, Wolfenstein, Resident Evil, Grand Theft Auto, Mortal Kombat, Gears of War, Alien, Dead Rising and Left for Dead together with individual titles such as Mad World, Def Jam Fight for NY and Army of Two.

In the evenings, the console and PC LAN setups at Power UP will also be converted into multiplayer stations running FPS games from the Call of Duty, Quake and Unreal series.

For more information and to book, visit the Museum of Science and Industry website .

All the games and consoles to play at Power UP!

Super Mario Run
Super Mario Run

Mario Brothers: Super Mario Bros (NES), Super Mario World & Super Mario Allstars (SNES), Super Mario 64 (N64), Super Mario Sunshine (Gamecube), Super Mario Galaxy (Wii), New Super Mario Bros (Wii)

Sonic the Hedgehog: Sonic the Hedgehog & Sonic the Hedgehog 2 (Megadrive), Sonic Chaos (Master System), Sonic CD (MegaCD), Sonic Adventure 2 (Dreamcast), Sonic Gems Collection (PS2), Sonic Generations (Xbox 360)

Fighting Games: Super Street Fighter 2 Turbo (SNES), Street Fighter IV (Xbox 360), Tekken 2 (PS1), Marvel v Capcom 2 (Dreamcast), Ultimate Marvel v Capcom 3 (Xbox 360)

Sci-fi Games: Batman (Megadrive), Alien Trilogy (PS1), Portal 2 (Xbox 360), Robocop vs Terminator / Universal Soldier (Megadrive), Super Star Wars (SNES), Star Wars: Pod Racer (N64)

Driving Games: Super Mario Kart (SNES), Destruction Derby (PS1), Road Rash (3DO), Project Gotham Racing 4 (Xbox 360), Ridge Racer V (PS2), Micro Machines (Megadrive)

Lego Games: Various games from the Lego series including Star Wars, Batman, Avengers, Indiana Jones

Disney Games: Toy Story Mania (Nintendo Wii), Toy Story 3 (Xbox 360), Aladdin & Jungle Book (Megadrive), Mickey Mouse Castle of Illusion (Master System), A Bug’s Life (PS1), Mickey Mania/Toy Story (Megadrive)

Rhythm Games: Taiko Drum Master (PS2), DJ Hero (Xbox 360), Samba di Amigo (Wii), Donkey Konga (Gamecube)

New Gen: Dirt 4, Micro Machines: World Series, Tekken 7 [PEGI 16], Injustice 2 [PEGI 16], Halo Wars 2, Rocket League, Snake Pass, Yooka-Laylee (Xbox One), Crash Bandicoot – N Sane Trilogy, Wipeout – Omega Collection, Wild Guns Reloaded, Street Fighter V (PS4), Bomberman, Splatoon 2 (Switch), plus a selection of older favourites.

Multiplayer Games

Four Player Classics

Cube #1: Bomberman (SNES), Mario Kart 64 (N64), Virtua Tennis (Dreamcast), Halo (Xbox);

Cube #2: Goldeneye (N64), Micro Machines 2 (Megadrive), Time Splitters 2 (Xbox), Revolt (Dreamcast)

Mario Kart Zone: Mario Kart Double Dash (Gamecube), Mario Kart Wii (Wii), Mario Kart 8 (Wii U)
Super Smash Bros Zone: Smash Bros Melee (Gamecube), Smash Bros Brawl (Wii), Smash Bros Wii U (Wii U)

Minecraft – 18 seats (Creative Server/LAN)

Halo 3 [PEGI 16] – 16 seats (LAN)

Other Areas

Classic arcade game Donkey Kong

Bartop Arcade Games: Pacman, Space Invaders, Frogger, Donkey Kong, Galaxian, Galaga, Sinistar, Robotron, Phoenix, Amidar, Qix, Pengo, Time Pilot, Centipede, Pengo, Dig Dug, Hyper Olympics, Kung Fu Master, Gauntlet, Rampage, Tapper, Ghosts n Goblins, Ghouls n Ghosts, Strider, Bomb Jack, Street Fighter series, King of Fighters series, Fatal Fury series, Samurai Showdown series, Metal Slug series, R-Type I/II/Leo, Gradius I/II/III, Salamander, Parodius, Double Dragon, Wonder Boy series, Final Fight, The Punisher, WWF Wrestlefest, Raiden, Bubble Bobble, The New Zealand Story, Puzzle Bobble, Mega Man 1/2, Aliens, Alien vs Predator, The Simpsons,Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 1/2, Do Donpachi, and many more.

Classic PC Games: Lemmings, Oh No More Lemmings, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Monkey Island 2, Heretic, Quake, Jazz Jackrabbit, Dune 2

Family Games: Mario & Sonic – Olympic Games (Wii), Sega & Sonic Allstar Racing Transformed (Xbox 360), Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles – The Arcade Game (Megadrive), Carnival Games/New Carnival Games Collection (Wii)

Games for Younger Children: Dora the Explorer Snow Princess/Disney Princess Enchanted Journey (Wii), Sega Superstars Tennis/Viva Piñata/Kameo (Xbox 360), Crash Bandicoot/Croc: Legend of the Gobbos (PS1)

The BBC Micro – the original educational computer: Granny’s Garden, PODD, Frogger, White Light.

Video Game Timeline

Pong

Binatone TV Master: Pong (Tennis), Football, Squash

Atari VCS: Q*Bert, Millipede, Missile Command, Galaxian, Ms Pacman, Space Invaders, Donkey Kong, Gorf

Vectrex: Bezerk, Minestorm, Space Wars, Spike, Cosmic Chasm

Acorn BBC Micro: Snapper, Elite, Repton, Rocket Raid, Chuckie Egg, Arcadians, many more

Sinclair ZX Spectrum: Bomb Jack, Manic Miner, Daley Thompson, Jet Set Willy, many more

Commodore 64: Toki, Navy Seals, Chase HQ 2

Amstrad CPC 464: Chuckie Egg

Atari XE: Donkey Kong Junior, Galaxian, Qix, River Raid

Atari ST: Super Sprint, Ikari Warriors, 1943

Commodore Amiga: Stunt Car Racer, Turrican 2, Alien Breed, Speedball 2, many more

Acorn Archimedes: Chaos Engine, Lemmings, Pacmania, Spheres of Chaos, Xenon II, Elite

Nintendo NES: Rainbow Islands, Donkey Kong Classics, Batman, Kung Fu, Paperboy, Duck Tales

SEGA Master System: Alex Kidd in Miracle World (Built-in Game), Wonderboy III: The Dragon’s Trap,Golden Axe, Choplifter, Cool Spot, Bomber Raid

NEC PC Engine: Super Star Soldier, R-Type, Thunderblade

SEGA Megadrive: Truxton, Sonic 3, Desert Strike, James Pond 2, Earthworm Jim, Streets of Rage

Super Nintendo: Pilotwings, F-Zero, NBA Jam, Super R-Type, Killer Instinct, Star Wing

Amiga CD32: Sensible Soccer, Pinball Fantasies, International Karate+, James Pond 2, Gloom

Atari Jaguar: Tempest 2000

SEGA Saturn: Daytona USA, Mass Destruction, Outrun/Afterburner/Space Harrier, SEGA Soccer

Sony PlayStation: Tomb Raider, Gran Turismo, Rayman, Cool Boarders, Pacman World, Crash Bandicoot 2, Die Hard Trilogy, Need for Speed, Worms: Armageddon

Nintendo 64: Banjo-Kazooie, Wave Race, Jet Force Gemini, WWF No Mercy, Bust A Move 2

SEGA Dreamcast: SEGA Rally, Toy Racer, Tomb Raider – The Last Revelation, Millennium Solider, Ready to Rumble 2 Boxing, Sonic Adventure, Soul Calibur, Chu Chu Rocket

Sony PlayStation 2: Super Monkeyball Deluxe, Crash Nitro Kart, Spyro Hero’s Tale, Gradius V,

Burnout: Dominator

Microsoft Xbox: Crash Tag Team Racing, Tetris Worlds, Dead or Alive, Soul Calibur II, Quantum Redshift, Pro Evolution Soccer 5

Nintendo Gamecube: F-Zero GX, Metroid Prime, Pokemon Colosseum, Wrestlemania X8, Fifa 2003

Microsoft Xbox 360: King of Fighters XIII, Tombraider Anniversary, Tombraider Legend, Minecraft – Story Mode, Burnout Paradise

Sony PlayStation 3: Little Big Planet 3, Gran Turismo 6, Naruto Ultimate Ninja Storm, Ratchet and

Clank Future: A Crack in Time, Motorstorm Apocalypse

Nintendo Wii: Donkey Kong Country Returns, Sin & Punishment, Speed Racer, Metroid Prime 3

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In his first days as the newly minted White House communications director, Anthony Scaramucci has spent some time deleting old tweets that don’t align with his new boss’s views.

During an interview on Fox News Sunday, host Chris Wallace said it was an understandable move, and pulled up a 2012 tweet in which Scaramucci advocated for tougher gun control laws.

“We (the USA) has 5% of the world’s population but 50% o f the world’s guns,” the tweet in question said. “Enough is enough. It is just common sense to apply more controls.”

Wallace reminded Scaramucci that “all this stuff lives forever,” and asked if he still believed that.

“Well, OK, so the answer to the question, and I’m a pro-Second Amendment person. My dad was a hunter, I’ve got no problem with that,” Scaramucci said. “What I was worried about in 2012, in urban centers, if you don’t have a little level of gun control, it could lead to more violence.”

Scaramucci then reiterated that he deleted his old tweets because they were a “total distraction.”

“When I made the decision to take this job, my politics and my political ideas do not matter at all,” he said. “What matters is that I am supporting — subordinating all of that to the president’s agenda.”

The new communications director first announced on Saturday that he would be deleting his previous tweets. “Full transparency: I’m deleting old tweets. Past views evolved & shouldn’t be a distraction. I serve @POTUS agenda & that’s all that matters,” Scaramucci tweeted.

The tweets

But Twitter users posted several screenshots of Scaramucci’s old tweets to preserve them even after they were deleted, and observed how at odds they were with many of President Donald Trump’s views:

In one tweet, Scaramucci said in reply to a user who said Hillary Clinton might be “in play” for the 2016 election: “I hope she runs, she is incredibly competent.”

In January 2016 — shortly after candidate Trump proposed banning all Muslims from entering the US — Scaramucci tweeted, “‘It is a fight within Islam, overwhelming majority see Islam as a religion of peace, want to live in multiracial/ethnic/faith democracies’.”

Scaramucci also slammed climate change skeptics in 2016. “You can take steps to combat climate change without crippling the economy. The fact many people still believe CC is a hoax is disheartening,” he said in a tweet that has since been deleted.

Trump has frequently cast doubt on the scientific consensus that anthropogenic climate change contributes to environmental depletion and poses a risk to human health. Trump has referred to climate change as a Chinese “hoax,” and in June, he announced he would pull the US out of the landmark Paris climate agreement.

In October 2015, Scaramucci threw his support behind Republican presidential contender Jeb Bush, whom Trump often slammed as “low energy.”

“Big number for @JebBush people just need to get to know him. Will make a great President,” Scaramucci tweeted.

In another 2015 tweet, Scaramucci picked apart Trump’s key campaign proposal for a border wall along the southern border between the US and Mexico. “Walls don’t work. Never have never will. The Berlin Wall 1961-1989 don’t fall for it,” Scaramucci tweeted.

Since being named communications director, Scaramucci has walked back his previous statements and apologized, in particular, for a 2015 Fox Business Network interview in which he called then-candidate Trump a “hack politician.”

He addressed the comment with Wallace on Sunday, explaining that they’re “both New Yorkers,” and during his first briefing on Friday, he said he regretted saying it.

Scaramucci added: “Mr. President, if you’re listening, I personally apologize for the 50th time for saying that.”

anthony scaramucci fox news sunday.JPG Anthony Scaramucci made his debut as the new communications head on Friday. Fox News Sunday/Screenshot

In his first days as the newly minted White House communications director, Anthony Scaramucci has spent some time deleting old tweets that don’t align with his new boss’s views.

During an interview on Fox News Sunday, host Chris Wallace said it was an understandable move, and pulled up a 2012 tweet in which Scaramucci advocated for tougher gun control laws.

“We (the USA) has 5% of the world’s population but 50% o f the world’s guns,” the tweet in question said. “Enough is enough. It is just common sense to apply more controls.”

Wallace reminded Scaramucci that “all this stuff lives forever,” and asked if he still believed that.

“Well, OK, so the answer to the question, and I’m a pro-Second Amendment person. My dad was a hunter, I’ve got no problem with that,” Scaramucci said. “What I was worried about in 2012, in urban centers, if you don’t have a little level of gun control, it could lead to more violence.”

Scaramucci then reiterated that he deleted his old tweets because they were a “total distraction.”

“When I made the decision to take this job, my politics and my political ideas do not matter at all,” he said. “What matters is that I am supporting — subordinating all of that to the president’s agenda.”

The new communications director first announced on Saturday that he would be deleting his previous tweets. “Full transparency: I’m deleting old tweets. Past views evolved & shouldn’t be a distraction. I serve @POTUS agenda & that’s all that matters,” Scaramucci tweeted.

The tweets

But Twitter users posted several screenshots of Scaramucci’s old tweets to preserve them even after they were deleted, and observed how at odds they were with many of President Donald Trump’s views:

In one tweet, Scaramucci said in reply to a user who said Hillary Clinton might be “in play” for the 2016 election: “I hope she runs, she is incredibly competent.”

In January 2016 — shortly after candidate Trump proposed banning all Muslims from entering the US — Scaramucci tweeted, “‘It is a fight within Islam, overwhelming majority see Islam as a religion of peace, want to live in multiracial/ethnic/faith democracies’.”

Scaramucci also slammed climate change skeptics in 2016. “You can take steps to combat climate change without crippling the economy. The fact many people still believe CC is a hoax is disheartening,” he said in a tweet that has since been deleted.

Trump has frequently cast doubt on the scientific consensus that anthropogenic climate change contributes to environmental depletion and poses a risk to human health. Trump has referred to climate change as a Chinese “hoax,” and in June, he announced he would pull the US out of the landmark Paris climate agreement.

In October 2015, Scaramucci threw his support behind Republican presidential contender Jeb Bush, whom Trump often slammed as “low energy.”

“Big number for @JebBush people just need to get to know him. Will make a great President,” Scaramucci tweeted.

In another 2015 tweet, Scaramucci picked apart Trump’s key campaign proposal for a border wall along the southern border between the US and Mexico. “Walls don’t work. Never have never will. The Berlin Wall 1961-1989 don’t fall for it,” Scaramucci tweeted.

Since being named communications director, Scaramucci has walked back his previous statements and apologized, in particular, for a 2015 Fox Business Network interview in which he called then-candidate Trump a “hack politician.”

He addressed the comment with Wallace on Sunday, explaining that they’re “both New Yorkers,” and during his first briefing on Friday, he said he regretted saying it.

Scaramucci added: “Mr. President, if you’re listening, I personally apologize for the 50th time for saying that.”

WASHINGTON ― Here’s something you may not know about President Donald Trump’s new communications director, Anthony Scaramucci: He’s an ardent supporter of gun control.

Scaramucci, a businessman and longtime Trump ally, has tweeted for years about his support for tighter gun laws, stating in 2012, “I have always been for strong gun control laws.” He’s also made the point that keeping a gun in your house is more likely to harm you or your loved ones than a potential intruder (which is true).

His views are not sitting well with Dana Loesch, the national spokeswoman for the National Rifle Association. On Friday, just as news was breaking about Scaramucci’s hiring, Loesch tweeted that Trump had made a “concerning” choice in Scaramucci since he has “a contrary position” to the president on gun rights. The tweet was later taken down.

Here’s a screenshot of the now-deleted tweet, compliments of Wayback Machine, a digital archive of the web.

Twitter

Loesch is suggesting that Scaramucci’s presence in the White House could complicate the NRA’s effort to advance its No. 1 legislative priority: national concealed carry reciprocity, which would require states that issue permits for concealed weapons to also recognize such permits from other states. Trump has publicly supported this policy.

Jennifer Baker, another NRA spokeswoman, told HuffPost that Loesch was only speaking for herself when she questioned Scaramucci’s views.

“Dana Loesch was not speaking on behalf of the National Rifle Association when she commented on recent White House personnel decisions,” she said.

Asked if the NRA does, then, have an official position on Trump hiring Scaramucci, Baker said only, “No.”

A White House spokeswoman did not respond to a request for comment on Trump’s and Scaramucci’s different views on gun safety.

Though her original tweet is deleted, Loesch tweeted out a few more thoughts about her concerns with Scaramucci.

HuffPost tweeted at Loesch and asked why she deleted her original, more critical tweet. She tweeted back that her tweets felt “redundant” and asked if it is “illegal” to delete a tweet. (It is not.)

Loesch, whose Twitter bio states that she is the NRA’s spokeswoman, did not respond when asked about the comment from Baker, the other NRA spokeswoman, that Loesch was not speaking for the NRA in her tweets.

Meanwhile, on the other side of the issue, Shannon Watts, founder of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, said Scaramucci could be a much-needed voice of reason in the White House.

“A vast majority of Americans ― including gun owners, NRA members and Republicans ― overwhelmingly support common-sense gun laws,” said Watts. “While NRA leaders may have a seat at the table in Trump’s White House, there are millions of Americans standing on the side of gun safety, possibly including the new White House Communications Director.”

Who was that guy who called Donald Trump a “hack politician”? Some fake news media rat? Oh no, it was the president’s new message man, back when he was off-message.

Some of Anthony Scaramucci’s past words:

—In an August 2015 appearance on Fox Business Network, Scaramucci called Trump a “hack politician.” Asked Friday whether Trump was aware of the comment, Scaramucci joked to reporters that the president mentions it every 15 seconds and called it one of his “biggest mistakes.” He then looked into the cameras and said: “Mr. President, if you’re listening, I personally apologize for the 50th time for saying that.”

—Gun control advocates were happy to share Scaramucci’s past tweets in support of stronger gun laws. Shannon Watts, of Moms Demand Action, tweeted that some of those posts were being deleted “but the Internet is forever, Anthony Scaramucci.” She revived this Scaramucci post from August 2012: “We (the USA) has 5% of the world’s population but 50% of the world’s guns. Enough is enough. It is just common sense it apply more controls.” Trump opposes tough gun laws.

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—Internet historians and Democrats also recirculated a May 2016 tweet in which Scaramucci addressed climate change and wrote that “the fact many people still believe CC is a hoax is disheartening.” Trump himself has at times labeled global warming a hoax.

O.J. Simpson, 70, appears in court for his parole hearing on July 20, 2017. (CNN Wire)

LOVELOCK, Nev. — O.J. Simpson was granted parole Thursday, after serving nearly nine years in prison for a 2007 armed robbery in Las Vegas. But the former NFL superstar and movie actor’s future outside of prison may not be so rosy.

Life outside the Lovelock Correctional Facility, a medium security prison in Nevada’s high desert, could well resemble Simpson’s solitary years after he was acquitted in the slayings of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend Ron Goldman, CNN legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin said Thursday.

“I think it will be a lot like life was between 1995 and 2007,” Toobin said. “He was really a pariah. His old life was gone — celebrity pitchman, sportscaster, actor, all gone.”

So what’s next for the 70-year-old, who was known as the “Juice” during his football heyday?

When will Simpson go free?

The next chapter in Simpson’s life could begin as soon as October, the earliest time he could be released, according to David Smith, a spokesman for the Nevada Board of Parole Commissioners.

What will Simpson do?

One option for Simpson, Toobin said, would be to return to a life of memorabilia sales and autograph signings.

“I think it will be a pretty seedy existence,” Toobin said. “He’ll be trying to make money off what’s left of his fame. It’s mostly infamy, not fame.”

Simpson’s involvement in the world of memorabilia sales was what got him a nine-to-33-year sentence for his role in a 2007 incident that unfolded in a Las Vegas hotel room.

Simpson and armed associates allegedly confronted two memorabilia dealers and took pieces of memorabilia from them.

The “Juice” was convicted on charges including kidnapping, armed robbery and assault with a deadly weapon.

The former college and pro football star said at his sentencing that he was trying to reclaim family heirlooms and other personal items that had been stolen from him, and claimed that he was unaware his associates were carrying guns.

What skills has Simpson gained behind bars?

At his parole hearing Thursday, Simpson said that he is a Baptist, and that a few other inmates asked him to help create Lovelock’s first Baptist service.

“I worked with them,” he said. “We now have an ongoing Baptist service that … is well attended. I attend it religiously, and pun is intended.”

“I was always a good guy but could have been a better Christian and my commitment to change is to be a better Christian,” he added.

Simpson also said he recently became commissioner of the 18-team softball league.

“My primary responsibility was rules enforcement and, you know, player comportment,” he said, adding that he decided on removing players from games and suspensions. “I never got any blow back from the guys because they know how to act. I’ve done the best I can and just trying to keep them out of trouble. So my agenda was full here. I’ve been active totally active for as long … I’ve been here. I don’t have much time to sit around and do anything.”

He also completed a number of courses, he said, including one entitled “Alternative to Violence.” “I think it’s the most important course anybody in this prison can take, because it teaches you how to deal with conflict, through conversation,” Simpson said.

“I have been asked many, many times here to mediate conflicts between individuals and groups,” he said. “And it gave me so many tools on how to use it, that you … try to walk these guys through. Not throwing punches at one another.”

O.J. Simpson, the blogger?

Simpson said he completed a computer course that has helped him stay in touch with his four children.

“I took a computer course here not because I was computer illiterate, but I took the computer course because … sometimes I could never get my kids on the phone,” he said. “But if you text them or send something to them on the computer you can get them.”

In June 1967, Simpson, then 19 years old, married his 18-year-old high school sweetheart, Marguerite Whitley. The couple had three children, Arnelle, Jason and Aaren. Aaren drowned in the family swimming pool just before her second birthday in 1979.

Simpson and Brown married in 1985 and had two children, daughter Sydney and son Justin.

In a letter to a friend — which was read in court — Simpson wrote, “Who knows, you may even see a webcast/blog in my future.”

How much is Simpson’s NFL pension worth?

Simpson stands to do better than most who have just been released from prison.

The NFL won’t say how much he’ll get from his NFL pension, and it’s hard to estimate without knowing some key details, such as when he decided to start collecting benefits. But according to the NFL benefits formula, if Simpson waited until age 65 to start drawing his pension, he could receive as much as $100,680 a year — and could have amassed more than $500,000 during the time he was in prison.

If he started at age 55, he would have accumulated $566,000 in benefits up until now, but he’d only get about $47,000 a year going forward.

Simpson also reportedly has made $5 million in contributions to a retirement plan run by the Screen Actor’s Guild, according to USA Today.

Were families of Ron Goldman and Nicole Brown ever compensated?

Simpson was found liable in a 1996 civil trial for the deaths of Goldman and Brown-Simpson, and was ordered to pay $33.5 million in damages — more money than he had. Most of that money has never been collected.

He moved to Florida, where state law prevented his pension and home from being seized to pay the damages. Simpson’s Heisman Trophy was ordered sold and brought in $230,000.

Where will Simpson go?

Simpson told the parole panel that he will likely return to Florida.

“I could stay in Nevada but I don’t think you guys want me here,” he joked.

Simpsons’ friend, Ozzie Fumo, a lawyer and Nevada state legislator, told CNN affiliate KLAS-TV that the former running back is “looking forward to the future.”

“He’s a better person than what a lot of people, you know, think he is,” Fumo said. “He’s not going to be golfing everyday. I think the physical part has really taken a toll on his life.”

Toobin predicted that Simpson will return to Florida, where bankruptcy laws will enable him to protect his assets from the Goldman family, and that he will likely continue to surround himself seedy figures from the memorabilia world.

“It’s a far cry from the old life in Brentwood, but it’s a hell of a lot better than being in Lovelock prison,” he said.

“He is a deeply delusional and self-obsessed narcissist, and, you know, good luck to America once he’s out,” Toobin said.