Miami-Dade County Courthouse.

PHOTO COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA

By BRENDAN FARRINGTON

Associated Press

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. Across the nation, 152 children under 12 were accidentally shot and killed, by either self-inflicted gunshot wounds or by another child, from 2014 through 2016. Seven of those cases were in Florida.

The Associated Press and USA Today researched the accidental shootings nationwide and found a difference in how law enforcement handles the cases, from no charges filed at all, to prison time for people who leave guns in places were children could access them. The same scenario has unfolded in Florida, where one sheriff said the death of the child was punishment enough, while others faced felony charges.

In Florida, it is illegal to store a loaded gun in a place where someone can reasonably expect a minor to gain access to it without a parent or guardian’s knowledge. The law requires loaded weapons be stored in a locked box or have a trigger lock.

Here’s a look at the Florida cases: Three-year-old Zuri Chambers shot herself between the eyes with the Kel-Tech 9mm handgun her father, Thomas, 41, left on a living room table in their Palm Beach County home as he was getting ready for work in February 2014. He told officers he hadn’t thought the girl was strong enough to pull the trigger, which requires 10 pounds of pressure. Chambers and his wife also told investigators the girl was found playing with the gun on two other occasions, including once when her mother woke to find the girl pointing the gun at her.

Thomas Chambers was sentenced to 10 years’ probation after pleading guilty to manslaughter.

Two-year-old Sheldon Salter Jr. accidentally killed himself with his father’s Glock handgun, which he found under his parents’ mattress after they sent him into the bedroom to get a clean diaper while they watched television in March 2014. The 28-year-old father was charged with culpable negligence for allowing a minor access to a gun resulting in death. He was sentenced to a year in jail and three years’ probation.

Three-year-old Robert Gaines Jr. shot himself in the face with his uncle’s gun while visiting his grandmother in Tallahassee in December 2014. Jaleel Taylor, 20, was sentenced to three years in prison on various charges, including culpable negligence for leaving a loaded firearm within access of a minor. The .380-caliber semiautomatic pistol had its serial number scratched off.

Two-year-old Kaleb Ahles shot himself in the middle of the chest after finding his father’s loaded .380-caliber handgun in the glove compartment of his parents’ car as they were moving out of their home in January 2015. The parents weren’t charged; Pinellas County Sheriff Bob Gualtieri said losing their child was punishment enough.

Eight-year-old Christopher Scurry Jr. was killed when his 12-year-old brother accidentally shot him while visiting their grandparents in Port Orange for the summer in July 2015. The older brother found the gun in an unlocked filing cabinet in the garage while the grandparents were out of town for the weekend, local media reported. The grandparents, Robert and Sabrina Potter, are charged with culpable negligence by leaving a loaded firearm within access to a minor, a felony. Investigators said the gun was reported stolen years earlier. The case is ongoing.

Four-year-old Amirra Jacques shot herself in the head with a .40-caliber Glock semi-automatic handgun she found on a bed in September 2016. Her uncle, Nathaniel Lowe, 26, and a 16-year-old were charged with culpable negligence by leaving a loaded firearm within access to a minor. Lowe also is charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm, grand theft of a firearm and tampering with evidence.

The teenager is charged with perjury and tampering with evidence after hiding the gun in the neighborhood, according to police records. The case is ongoing.

A three-year-old girl was fatally shot by her eight-year-old brother with a .22- caliber rifle in their parents’ closet in Pensacola in December 2016. Deputies found two other long guns, ammunition in a cloth basket that also held toys, and a multitude of drugs and drug paraphernalia. The state attorney’s office decided against charging the parents in the girl’s death and is still investigating the drug case, the Pensacola News-Journal reported. The newspaper withheld their identities because no one has been charged.

KOLKATA: Ian Grillot, who was injured while trying to intervene during a racially-motivated shooting in Kansas in which an Indian techie was killed, was honoured on the CBS talk show titled ‘The Doctors’. After the incident, producer Boat Angel Films of Trisha Ray‘s ‘Orphan Train’ presented a cheque of USD 10,000 to help Ian buy a car. The film starring Bollywood actress Mahie Gill and San Banarje talks about how one always has the choice to help or hurt their country. Excerpts from an interview with the Kolkata-born director on the immigrant experience in Houston now:

What prompted you to make this gesture of presenting a cheque to Ian Grillot?

The very generous gesture was from our long-time producing partners Boat Angel Outreach and Boat Angel Family Films (‘Sugarbaby’, ‘Federal Case’, ‘Orphan Train’ etc). Boat Angel is a Christian non-profit foundation that helps the lesser-fortunate people and children all over the world and has been instrumental in changing the lives of several. When he heard about Ian Grillot’s heroics, Brian (Stewart), the founder of Boat Angel, immediately wanted to do something to help. The Emmy-winning show ‘The Doctors’ provided that opportunity for him. About this gesture, Brian had said: “All during the filming of ‘Orphan Train’, I was upset that our crew was being profiled simply because they were from India/Mexico and other places. We had done three others films in Texas and it had never happened before in the last ten years that we have been working together. At first, it seemed surreal but it was affecting the mood and the joy of the crew. We had come together to make a statement to stand against those who wanted to terrorize and hurt our citizens and call on God for protection. Trisha and I discussed about Ian (Grillot) and how he stood up for good people working for our companies, adding value and being unjustly hurt by those who did not look at the content of a man’s heart but the colour of their skin. When the opportunity came to help Ian out as he was hurt and could not work and needed a vehicle, we were glad to help him. We want to send a message. We welcome those who come to America to help us build a great country where you can come, achieve your dreams, practice your beliefs and raise your children free from hate and oppression.”

Being a Bengali living in Houston for years, have you noticed any change in the experience of being an immigrant in the recent years?

Proper Houston actually is a very liberal city with a large number of immigrants. So, the shift in an immigrant experience is noticeable only in pockets- mainly among those who come from suburbs. During the filming of the exterior shots of ‘Orphan Train’ outside the city, we were always stopped by cops or concerned neighbours/passers-by.

Racial profiling and immigrant problem that were not so overt before, now seem to be an accepted norm. We had to be very careful because Texas is an open-carry state (where guns can be publicly flaunted), and we didn’t want someone trying to be a hero and shooting at us. Once while filming in the Mexico-US border, a nearby business owner warned us that there could be snipers who would try to take down our ‘terrorists’ and border patrols might take into custody our ‘orphan’ actors (who by the way, are all Americans of Mexican descent).

In fact, a week after elections, in November, while waiting for my actress near a military base, a random stranger started taping me with his phone. When he saw San coming out of the car to my defence, he got so scared that he called the authorities. Usually, I don’t mind people getting scared of San when he is in character because he does look like the stereotypical terrorist. But on that particular day, San was not shooting and was in his natural self!

This guy reported us to the FBI. Two weeks later, Homeland Security and Anti-Terror Joint Task Force visited us and interrogated him before closing the case. They were very apologetic.

But our entire neighbourhood came to know of their visit (as they had parked their FBI truck right in front of our place). Since then, we have noticed different attitude from different neighbours. Some have been super nice to us, and some others have been terrified of us, including our very talkative next-door neighbour, who always used to mock us that we would be ‘deported to Mexico’ once Trump put the wall up.

What’s ‘Orphan Train’ about?

‘Orphan Train’ is an action-packed commercial film and TV series in Spanish, English and Hindi language, about an evil kingpin Yatze (San Banarje) who runs the clan named ‘Guerreros’ (Warriors) that is responsible for terrorizing the neighbourhoods of Mexico with kidnappings, killings, drug cartels, extortion etc. His clan’s current mission is to expand his kingdom into USA by using young kidnapped orphans to carry his weapons of mass destruction across the border. Concerned with the recent news that Yatze is preparing his new orphan trainees to attack USA, FBI turns to Environmental Protection Agency Investigator Helen Prost (Mahie Gill) to help track down his whereabouts, which he has managed to keep secret with his sophisticated equipment. Meantime, the four orphan trainees, led by David (Romario Solis), escape from Yatze’s ranch, strapped with the bags full of bombs, praying to find someone trustworthy who is not purchased by the villains and can help them reach to safety. However, they are unaware that the bombs inside the bags can be remotely triggered and be used to kill them all. While chasing David and his friends, Yatze’s men spot Helen and her K9 partner Max (Gablu Banarje) and go after them, thus starting an action-packed adventure.

What’s your next film about?

It is called ‘9 July, Buenos Aires’. This is a father-daughter story about young Medical College Professor Nicolas Romagnoli and his eight-year old daughter Yanina, who plan to open a bold anti-government play at a time when President Videla imposed a hard censorship over media and expressive artform. They planned to do it so that they could expose the holocaust in Argentina to the international media and pressurize USA to cut aids to a country involved in human rights violation and thereby forcing the atrocities to end. Aware that if they get caught, they will ‘disappear’, Nicolas keeps the details of the play heavily guarded. But General Giraldi has already placed his mole in the troupe in the form of the stunning Luisa, who must decide whether to protect Nicolas or to give him up for her own safety. Nicolas will be played by Javier Godino, the lead actor of the Oscar-winning Argentine film titled ‘A Secret in their Eyes’.

I’ve been working on this screenplay (earlier titled ‘Regression’) since 2010. I have scouted locations, made a short in Buenos Aires as a prelude in 2011, with an intention to shoot it in 2013. But, then we got busy with the production of three other movies that had financing in place (all three are now released), and when we were ready again to shoot it in 2015, we got busy with two other projects – ‘A Curry on an American Plate’ and ‘Orphan Train’. I have now decided not to take up any other production until we are done with this film which I consider my bucket list. It will be shot in English mainly so we could cater to an International audience who don’t like subtitles and some Spanish (Castellano).

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While terrorist incidents like what recently occurred in Manchester or terrorist threats that could ban laptops on international flights raise fears, active shooter incidents of all kinds are actually a more common threat for Americans. Just consider the following infographic:

And as with terrorism, one can still argue that your chances are being hit by a car or being in a car accident or perhaps even struck by lightening are far greater than being in a terrorist or an active shooter incident. However, such arguments tend to do little to reassure the general public as any terrorist or active shooter incident will definitely grab attention from the media.

That brings me to small cap security stock Patriot One Technologies (OTCQB: PTOTF) which has developed PATSCAN – the next generation of its award-winning NForce CMR1000 software and radar solution. PATSCAN is a first-of-its-kind Cognitive Microwave Radar concealed weapons detection system as an effective tool to combat active shooter threats before they occur. Designed for cost-effective deployment in weapon-restricted buildings and facilities, the Patriot One software solution and related hardware can be installed in hallways and doorways to covertly identify weapons and to alert security of an active threat entering the premises. Owner/operators of private and certain public facilities can now prominently post anti-weapons policies with compliance assured. The Company’s motto, “Deter, Detect and Defend,” is based on the belief that widespread use of its technology will act as an effective deterrent.

Back in April, Patriot One Technologies announced that they were the winners of the Anti-Terrorism / Force Protection category in the New Product Showcase (NPS) component of the ISC West industry trade show and conference in Las Vegas, NV. Security Industry Association (SIA) judges possess a minimum of 10 years’ experience in the selection, purchase and/or installation of products within the category that they are judging with the New Product Showcase being the premier platform for security professionals to evaluate new products and technologies for use in security applications. The Company also hosted a pair of informative panel sessions which included security experts from Canada, the USA, UK and South Africa encompassing the private and public sectors, as well as entertainment and education spaces.

Patriot One Technologies’s CEO & Director commented:

“We are very pleased to achieve this exciting award today. Positive peer review in our industry is essential for growth, and this award in particular highlights and validates our efforts to-date. We are generating significant interest at this very important event and are already receiving congratulations and interest from around the world.”

“As this is the largest security industry trade show in the U.S. today, we are enjoying the visibility we are achieving amongst some of the world leaders in the security industry. I came to this event with the belief that we would find ourselves benchmarked against the best products in the market for weapons detection, and to come out on top of our category is really big news for us, our partners and stakeholders alike. We have a full slate of meetings to complete before we leave the event and look forward to following up in the coming weeks and months ahead.”

Last week, Patriot One Technologies also announced it had entered into a reseller agreement with systems integration experts SENGEX of McLean, Virginia who has been awarded and maintains contracts within a number of U.S. government organizations. The President and CTO stated:

“Patriot One has seen huge demand in the market related to the PATSCAN CMR technology. Given our engineering resources are firmly concentrated on manufacturing scalability, new product evolutions, and advancing our weapons identification programs, we have determined our best approach is to focus on relationships with resellers who have committed sales, engineering, and financial resources to the promotion of PATSCAN CMR. This joint partnership with our resellers will guarantee that our clients will receive the best possible solution aimed at ensuring that we achieve our primary goal of ending the loss of life and property due to the unlawful use of guns, knives or explosive devices.”

“We are excited to begin presenting to specific federal agencies with immediate need. We will work with our partners to secure FCC waivers to ensure rapid installation at those federal departments where time is of the essence for deployment. It is our plan that the initial commitment of 50 units ship as fast as we can prepare them, potentially being installed as quickly as late summer – much faster than any of our previous projections indicated. Our team is absolutely ready for the job ahead, and fully committed to solving the dilemma presented by the increasingly deadly acts of public violence which we hope to help bring to an end.”

Finally, it should be mentioned that small cap Patriot One Technologies trades on the OTC Venture Marketplace (OTCQB) – the middle tier of the over-the-counter (OTC) market intended for entrepreneurial and development stage US and international companies. To be eligible for a OTCQB listing, companies must be current in their reporting to a US regulator (or are listed on a qualified international stock exchange) and undergo an annual verification and management certification process to verify officers, directors, controlling shareholders and shares outstanding. This means there is more piece of mind for investors who want to invest in OTCQB stocks like Patriot One Technologies.

When Beach Boys Brian Wilson and Mike Love wrote “All Summer Long” back in 1964, they did not think to include watching television along with miniature golf and spilling Coke on one’s blouse to capture the delights of the season. TV took a kind of summer vacation itself back then, filling prime time with reruns.

Well, things have changed. Trends emerge. At least six new series this summer are set in the 1970s or ’80s, four of those take place in Los Angeles, and two of them involve “The Tonight Show.” Two mess around with Shakespeare; two adapt Stephen King. Pick a few or watch them all – ha! Here’s a partial guide to what’s in store.

“I’m Dying Up Here”

Showtime, June 4, 10 p.m.

A more or less affectionate, bittersweet, believable take on the early-1970s L.A. stand-up scene, with Melissa Leo as a club owner who is not exactly the Comedy Store’s Mitzi Shore and Ari Graynor vivid as a female comic struggling to be heard in a little boy’s world.

“Claws”

TNT, June 11, 9 p.m.

Niecy Nash stars as a Sarasota nail salon owner out to own a better salon, a dream that involves her with criminal types – though you could cut the crime from this story and still have characters good enough to go on. Carrie Preston, Judy Reyes and Jenn Lyon are in her crew; Harold Perrineau plays her brother.

“The Putin Interviews”

Showtime, June 12, 9 p.m.

It’s nonfiction on the face of it, but viewers will have their work cut out sorting fact from fancy when Oliver Stone and Vladimir Putin rub their agendas together in this four-part chat. Episodes air consecutively across the week.

“The Mist”

Spike, June 22, 10 p.m.

Stephen King’s Maine-set novella becomes a full-blown series, with Frances Conroy and Isiah Whitlock Jr. Don’t go in the mist, basically.

“GLOW”

Netflix, June 23, to stream

Alison Brie (desperate, determined) and Marc Maron (weary, grumpy) star in Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch’s spunky comedy of 1980s cable-TV women’s wrestling.

“Prime Suspect: Tennison”

PBS, June 25, 10 p.m.

Prequel detective series features the 1973-model Jane Tennison (Stefanie Martini) before she grew up to be Helen Mirren.

“Gypsy”

Netflix, June 30, to stream

Movie star Naomi Watts takes the lead in a drama about a New York City therapist (Watts) who crosses lines therapists are not supposed to cross.

“Snowfall”

FX, July 5, 10 p.m.

“Boyz n the Hood” director John Singleton co-created this glossy, well-acted tale of crack cocaine coming to L.A. in 1983. zit’s one of those stories in which everyone’s bad, but some are worse than others.

“Will”

TNT, July 10, 9 p.m.

William Shakespeare is a hot twentysomething among hot twentysomethings in this Young Guns of Elizabethan Theater drama from regular Baz Luhrmann scripter Craig Pearce. Southwark represent!

“The Bold Type”

Freeform, July 11, 9 p.m.

Print is still happening in this series set around a women’s magazine. Melora Hardin plays the editor in chief (partly modeled on executive producer Joanna Coles, who ran Cosmopolitan).

“Salvation”

CBS, July 12, 9 p.m.

CBS marks another summer with a sci-fi serial. This one has an asteroid heading to Earth. Santiago Cabrera is the Elon Musk-alike who thinks he can stop it.

“Hooten & the Lady”

CW, July 13, 9 p.m.

In the old spirit of plugging the summer with British imports comes this treasure-hunting riff on “Romancing the Stone” and “Indiana Jones.” Michael Landes is an American regular guy, Ophelia Lovibond an aristocratic curator. Together they’re (see title).

“Friends From College”

Netflix, July 14, to stream

Into each generation a “Big Chill” is born. Reunion comedy directed by Nicholas Stoller (“Forgetting Sarah Marshall”) makes it official that Keegan-Michael Key, Fred Savage, Cobie Smulders, Nat Faxon, Annie Parisse, Jae Suh Park and Billy Eichner are no longer young.

“Raven’s Home”

Disney Channel, July 21, 10 p.m.; moves to 8:30 p.m. July 28

Or, “That’s Still So Raven.” Raven-Symone returns to her old network and character, now the mother of twins, sharing a house with former castmate Anneliese van der Pol, who has a kid of her own. Listen, it worked for “Fuller House.”

“Midnight, Texas”

NBC, July 24, 10 p.m.

Other books by “True Blood” author Charlaine Harris are the basis of this more whimsical small-town mystery. Francois Arnaud playsa psychic medium in a hamlet whose residents include a witch, a vampire, an angel and a werewolf. There are weirder places in Texas.

“Room 104”

HBO, July 28, 11 p.m.

Mark and Jay Duplass (“Togetherness”) are behind this anthology series, which sets a dozen stories in the same “corporate chain hotel” room.

“The Sinner”

USA, Aug. 2, 10 p.m.

In the first season of what’s meant to be an anthology series, Jessica Biel stars as a young mother who commits an apparently random act of violence; Bill Pullman plays a police detective trying to work out why.

“Mr. Mercedes”

DirecTV/AT&T, Aug. 9, 8 p.m.

David E. Kelley adapts Stephen King’s 2014 detective novel. Brendan Gleeson plays an ex-cop taunted out of retirement by letters from crazy killer Harry Treadaway.

“Get Shorty”

Epix, Aug. 13, 10 p.m.

Ray Romano and Chris O’Dowd co-star in a series inspired by the Elmore Leonard novel. O’Dowd plays a contract killer who wants to get out of that business and into the business called “show”; Romano is his reluctant new producing partner.

“Marlon”

NBC, Aug. 16, 9 p.m.

Marlon Wayans plays a wacky dad co-parenting with ex-wife. He’s the father as child and yet also the child as father. (Nods thoughtfully.)

“Marvel’s The Defenders”

Netflix, Aug. 18, to stream

Superhero collab brings crime fighters from “Daredevil,” “Jessica Jones,” “Luke Cage” and “Iron Fist” into a single series. Will it be four times the fun or just divided into quarters?

“The Tick”

Amazon, Aug. 25, to stream

Third adaptation (second live-action) of Ben Edlund’s comical comic, with Peter Serafinowicz as the hard-to-kill, blue-suited superhero.

“Disjointed”

Netflix, Aug. 25, to stream

From Chuck Lorre and former “Daily Show” head writer David Javerbaum, a workplace comedy with Kathy Bates running an L.A. pot dispensary. This is indeed a changing world.

It was a Christmas miracle. On 25 December 1989, Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega, who has died this week, sought refuge in the Papal Nunciatura (the Vatican’s embassy in Panama). Noriega was facing a US indictment for narco-trafficking, as well as claims of electoral fraud. To smoke him out, General “Mad Max” Thurman ordered construction of a “musical barrier” around the embassy – constant barrages of sound played from the speakers of encircling US army Humvees.

The first day was something of a truce – Christmas music. But thereafter, things rapidly descended towards classic rock. Noriega was an opera fan. Instead of Verdi, he got a psyops playlist that included Billy Idol’s Flesh for Fantasy, Welcome to the Jungle by Guns N’ Roses, God Bless the USA by Lee Greenwood, We’re Not Going to Take It by Twisted Sister, several songs by the Doors: Strange Days, People Are Strange, The End War Pigs by Black Sabbath, Electric Spanking of War Babies by Funkadelic, and most worryingly of all: If I Had a Rocket Launcher by Bruce Cockburn. Faced with the sanity-destroying power of middle-American mallrat music, Noriega surrendered.

At the time, President George Bush considered the tactic excessive, but use of it only grew. In 1993, the FBI turned its speakers on the Branch Davidians, a religious cult, at the Waco siege in Texas. There, they skipped the metal for brain-frazzle eclecticism: Tibetan chants, bugle calls, Christmas carols, Nancy Sinatra’s These Boots Are Made for Walkin’.

In grimmer circumstances, Justin Bieber has been used on loop to break down detainees in Guantánamo Bay. In Iraqi jails, Barney the Dinosaur, Sesame Street and Metallica were used to culturally offend and sleep-deprive prisoners. Barney’s I Love You was a particular favourite – “I love you, you love me – we’re a happy family / With a great big hug and a kiss from me to you / Won’t you say you love me too?” – because it was what psyopers refer to as “futility music”, inflicting such levels of banality that the suspect begins to feel apathy towards their own extremist positions. Others were more obvious morale-busters: Camp X-Ray’s wake-up call was once Born in the USA – though it’s unclear whether prisoners or guards understood its powerfully anti-Vietnam anti-Uncle Sam nuance.

Despite long-standing queries over how effective it really is, the practice is now so widespread that, in 2008, various musicians including Rage Against the Machine and Massive Attack launched an initiative called ZerodB, to try to stamp it out. It’s a strange, backhanded compliment to the emotion they put into their songs in the first place. The fact that music is so psychologically powerful means that, like a loaded gun, it can just as easily be turned to evil.

The Indian cricket team is on a roll. They are the best Test side in the world, winning three home series in a row, being undefeated in a Test series for a while now. They are the defending champions of the Champions Trophy. A very effective T20 side as well, and going by the local talent that we have seen at this year’s IPL, it won’t be long before they become world T20 champions again. For once in our cricketing history, we can surely say that we have a team that can win in any format, anywhere in the world. Such is that talent in the present squad. But what if I tell you that the most talented player in India, is not a certainty in this squad?

If you were to ask any Indian cricket fan, who is the best player in the Indian team, you won’t be surprised to hear Virat Kohli’s name. To be fair, Kohli has done exceptionally well to warrant this praise, both as a batsman and as a captain. Some fans may say Ravichandran Ashwin is the best bowler in the world and that would be very hard to disagree. But why isn’t Rohit Sharma’s name spoken in the same vein?

The enigma that is Rohit Sharma, is pretty hard to comprehend. His sublime talent can leave you spellbound. Effortless elegance, the man can play those classy shots with nonchalant ease. He can take on any bowling in the world and make them look dismal. He can pick the length very early and play very late. He is so good that he can employ the front-foot pull shot to the fastest of bowlers, whacking them over the mid-wicket boundary, or he could just loft the length deliveries, straight over the sight screen. He became the first player in the world to score two double hundreds in ODIs. He is the third Indian cricketer to score back-to- back centuries in his first two Tests. With his T20 century against South Africa, he became the first Indian player to score centuries in all three formats. Not only is he pleasing to watch, he has the ability to go on and on, carrying his bat right through. Yet, Kohli has a better record in all three formats. Few would even remember that it was Rohit (June 2007) who made his international debut at least a year before Virat Kohli (August 2008) made his.

A quick comparison of their stats:

Rohit Sharma

Format Tests ODI T20I
Matches 21 153 62
Runs 1184 5131 1364
Average 37.00 41.37 31.72
100s/50s 2/7 10/29 10/29
Top Score 177 264 106

Virat Kohli

Format Tests ODI T20I
Matches 54 179 48
Runs 4451 7755 1709
Average 51.75 53.10 53.40
100s/50s 16/14 27/39 0/16
Top Score 235 183 90*

The enigma of Rohit Sharma is not an anomaly. A look back at the previous generation of international cricketers reveals that Pakistan’s Inzamam-ul-Haq is much the same. Inzamam announced his arrival onto the world stage with his swashbuckling knock to put Pakistan in the final of the 1992 World Cup and then followed it up with a crucial knock in the summit clash to win them the trophy. He was instantly compared to two other young guns of that era — Brian Lara and Sachin Tendulkar. Though Inzamam went on to have a great career, he isn’t spoken in the same breath as the other two.

The playing style of Rohit too is reminiscent of Inzamam, and every attribute mentioned of Rohit from the earlier paragraph, would apply to Inzy as well. Inzy was also blessed with the rare talent of picking the length early and playing late. Besides, he also played in the best-ever Pakistani cricket team. The Pakistan squad of the 90’s was loaded with talent. The batting line-up included the likes of Saeed Anwar, Aamir Sohail, Javed Miandad, Salim Malik and Ijaz Ahmed, but it was Inzamam who was the most gifted of the lot. He was gifted enough to last midway through the next generation, seeing the emergence of Yusuf Youhana, Younis Khan and others. Yet, he wasn’t Pakistan’s top run-getter in Tests, Younis and Miandad are ahead of him. His ODI stats are better, but they didn’t translate into consistent victories. This is where, both Lara and Tendulkar, are one up over Inzy.

Make no mistake, Rohit and Inzy are great players and have had good careers. However, they have the talent to be those exceptional players and proven match winners’ day in and day out. Being gifted with talent is one thing, making effective use of that talent is a rare skill altogether. Rohit is still in his prime and has a lot of years ahead of him. Injuries and form factored in, if he makes full use of his talent, there is no stopping him.

Kapil Dev has thrown down the gauntlet by favouring England to win the Champions Trophy this year. With the squad that England has, plus home conditions and recent form, he’s fully justified. But for India to defend the title, not only do we need the likes of Kohli and Ashwin firing in all cylinders, but also the support cast, led by Rohit himself.

Also by the author:

Kohli no Trump, but India certainly the USA of world cricket

Best India Captains debate: What if I say both Shastri & Azhar are correct?

Speaking at a conference on gun violence, public health expert Lawrence Wallack began by informing his audience that, “just in the last decade, we’ve had 300,000 gun deaths.”

“That’s about the size of Stockton, California, or Lexington, Kentucky, or Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,” he said.

Dr. Wallack spoke during a panel titled “Battle Lines: Who is framing the gun debate?”

Treating gun deaths as a public health issue is a convenient way for gun-control advocates to frame the issue. If guns are a dangerous product that results in death or serious injury, then they ought to be banned just like asbestos or defective laptop batteries.

Does this framing make sense? Not really. Very few people die because of defective firearms. In this sense, firearms are much safer than they were fifty or a hundred years ago. As Dr. Wallack explained later on, roughly two-thirds of gun deaths are suicides, and roughly one-third are homicides; accidents and unintentional deaths compose a small fraction of total gun deaths each year.

In other words, we have a problem with gun deaths because people use guns to kill themselves and others. The relevant public policy question is whether specific gun control measures reduce the number of homicides and suicides, not just homicides or suicides committed with guns.

Some researchers have argued that firearms make suicide more tempting and more lethal. However, the data doesn’t support that. Japan and Korea have some of the worlds strictest gun laws and lowest rates of gun ownership, yet they have some of the world’s highest suicide rates. America has the world’s highest gun ownership rate by far, and it has an average suicide rate.

Psychology Today — not exactly American Rifleman or Guns and Ammodismissed the link between suicide and gun ownership: “There is no relation between suicide rate and gun ownership rates around the world. According to the 2016 World Health Statistics report, (2) suicide rates in the four countries cited as having restrictive gun control laws have suicide rates that are comparable to that in the U. S. Australia, 11.6, Canada, 11.4, France, 15.8, UK, 7.0, and USA 13.7 suicides/100,000. By comparison, Japan has among the highest suicide rates in the world, 23.1/100,000, but gun ownership is extremely rare, 0.6 guns/100 people.”

The data on gun control and homicide rates doesn’t support the claims of gun-control activists either. The U.S has a lot of guns, and compared to other developed nations a lot of homicide. However, this relationship doesn’t appear to hold for other countries, and may in fact be the inverse. More importantly, homicide in America is demographically concentrated among young black males; non-Hispanic whites do not have a particularly high homicide rate.

Gun-control activists talk about “gun-deaths,” and they believe that if they reduce “gun-deaths” they have saved lives. They do this because they see the issue in product safety terms. Mayor Bloomberg sees gun-control as an extension of his crusade against smoking and sugary soft drinks.

For the five hundred or so Americans who die from unintentional gunshot wounds, the product safety model might make some sense. For the twenty thousand Americans who commit suicide with guns, it doesn’t make much sense.

In gauging whether gun-control is effective the relevant question is what impact does gun-control have on the overall murder rate or the overall suicide rate. In terms of suicide the answer seems to be not much, and in terms of homicide gun-control might actually be counterproductive.

Speaking at a conference on gun violence, public health expert Lawrence Wallack began by informing his audience that, “just in the last decade, we’ve had 300,000 gun deaths.”

“That’s about the size of Stockton, California, or Lexington, Kentucky, or Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,” he said.

Dr. Wallack spoke during a panel titled “Battle Lines: Who is framing the gun debate?”

Treating gun deaths as a public health issue is a convenient way for gun-control advocates to frame the issue. If guns are a dangerous product that results in death or serious injury, then they ought to be banned just like asbestos or defective laptop batteries.

Does this framing make sense? Not really. Very few people die because of defective firearms. In this sense, firearms are much safer than they were fifty or a hundred years ago. As Dr. Wallack explained later on, roughly two-thirds of gun deaths are suicides, and roughly one-third are homicides; accidents and unintentional deaths compose a small fraction of total gun deaths each year.

In other words, we have a problem with gun deaths because people use guns to kill themselves and others. The relevant public policy question is whether specific gun control measures reduce the number of homicides and suicides, not just homicides or suicides committed with guns.

Some researchers have argued that firearms make suicide more tempting and more lethal. However, the data doesn’t support that. Japan and Korea have some of the worlds strictest gun laws and lowest rates of gun ownership, yet they have some of the world’s highest suicide rates. America has the world’s highest gun ownership rate by far, and it has an average suicide rate.

Psychology Today — not exactly American Rifleman or Guns and Ammodismissed the link between suicide and gun ownership: “There is no relation between suicide rate and gun ownership rates around the world. According to the 2016 World Health Statistics report, (2) suicide rates in the four countries cited as having restrictive gun control laws have suicide rates that are comparable to that in the U. S. Australia, 11.6, Canada, 11.4, France, 15.8, UK, 7.0, and USA 13.7 suicides/100,000. By comparison, Japan has among the highest suicide rates in the world, 23.1/100,000, but gun ownership is extremely rare, 0.6 guns/100 people.”

The data on gun control and homicide rates doesn’t support the claims of gun-control activists either. The U.S has a lot of guns, and compared to other developed nations a lot of homicide. However, this relationship doesn’t appear to hold for other countries, and may in fact be the inverse. More importantly, homicide in America is demographically concentrated among young black males; non-Hispanic whites do not have a particularly high homicide rate.

Gun-control activists talk about “gun-deaths,” and they believe that if they reduce “gun-deaths” they have saved lives. They do this because they see the issue in product safety terms. Mayor Bloomberg sees gun-control as an extension of his crusade against smoking and sugary soft drinks.

For the five hundred or so Americans who die from unintentional gunshot wounds, the product safety model might make some sense. For the twenty thousand Americans who commit suicide with guns, it doesn’t make much sense.

In gauging whether gun-control is effective the relevant question is what impact does gun-control have on the overall murder rate or the overall suicide rate. In terms of suicide the answer seems to be not much, and in terms of homicide gun-control might actually be counterproductive.

Arizona man with a beef against “Green Ranger” Jason David Frank charged with attempted murder


Published 7:14 pm, Saturday, May 27, 2017

A man carrying weapons and insisting he was the real-life embodiment of Marvel’s vigilante, The Punisher, was arrested at Phoenix Comicon Thursday after he told authorities he was targeting “bad police officers,” according to The Phoenix New Times.

According to court documents, it was later discovered that the man, 31-year-old Matthew Sterling had a vendetta against “Mighty Morphin Power Rangers” star Jason David Frank, who played the Green Ranger. Police said they later found a notation on Sterling’s calendar the day he was at Comicon that simply read “Kill JDF.”

Sterling, was in possession of four firearms and “several knives” at Comicon at the time of his arrest, according to USA Today.


The Phoenix New Times reports that Sterling was charged with attempted murder, resisting arrest, aggravated assault, carrying a weapon in a prohibited place, and wearing body armor during the commission of a felony. His bail was set at $1 million.

Sterling told police that although he was aware his real guns and other weapons were not allowed inside the event, the rules didn’t apply to him because he was “The Punisher,” the Marvel Comics anti-hero who stoops to murder, kidnap, torture and other acts of violence in his war against crime.

“Do to the pending allegations, I will only state, I do not know the person who was arrested, but I will pray for him,” Frank said at a press conference. “This incident is an eye-opening situation to increase and add more security to all Comicons around the world.” Do to the increased security, for the duration of the show, all prop weapons are banned from the remained Phoneix show.



Frank later posted a video message on Facebook, saying in part, “Even though it looks like things don’t faze me, I refuse to have a situation tear me apart mentally. You gotta remember, things could always be worse. Things could’ve been worse. But it wasn’t. You know, everyone is safe, things are okay, and it’s a great thing.”

Read original story ‘Power Rangers’ Actor Targeted by Man Claiming To Be Marvel Vigilante ‘The Punisher’ at Comicon At TheWrap

From Krist Boardman:

The May 24 issue of USA TODAY featured a lead, front page article about the absolute tragedy of accidental gun violence in homes in the United States, violence which kills on the average of one child a week. But it’s not just the innocent children who die; their families and communities suffer terribly.

These accidents are preventable. Virtually all of these terrible incidents is the result of careless adults leaving loaded guns out somewhere in homes and cars where they are accessed by children and are inadvertently shot to death or where they unintentionally shoot another playmate or brother or sister.

The article, “Added Agony,” states that “children under age 12 die from gun accidents in the United States about once a week, on average. Almost every death begins with the same basic circumstances: an unsecured and loaded gun, a guardian’s lapse in attention. And each ends with the same basic questions: Who is to blame, and should the person be punished?”

Obviously someone is responsible for these unacceptable incidents. If not the owners of the guns, then who? But the USA article notes that prosecution and enforcement of these is very irregular. Some people go to jail for not securing the guns, while others do not. In either case the consequences are bad. The person who may go to jail could and frequently is the single mother of surviving children. Not only does the mother feel badly about the child who was killed, the surviving children lose their mother and may end up spending their younger years in foster care.

If there are no criminal penalties for not securing the guns that lead to these tragedies, justice is also not served. Granted that the loss of the child is a terrible punishment for a family member, a punishment they may never recover from. But the state is responsible for protecting the most vulnerable especially and to do nothing is to abrogate the state’s responsibility.

There is a solution and that is vigorous education on the responsibility to secure guns in the household so they are not accessible to children. The best solution is not to have a gun in the house where it could also be used in an incident of domestic violence, but if guns are kept in the house they must be kept securely away from children (and other irresponsible people–more on that later).

Statistically speaking, one child killed from accidental gun death per week does not sound like a lot in a country our size, but…….52 children killed a year from this method is 52 too many.

Of course, a lot more people than that die in the United States from gun violence. It could be as many as 50,000 people a year. As a nurse working in the central Maryland prison hospital I see many, many victims of gun violence. These are the survivors who are not dead, and while there are a lot of them in the prison hospital there are also a lot of other surviving gunshot victims I do not see who are in regular hospitals. The costs of treating and rehabilitating these people have to be considerable.

We are hampered by the inability to collect sufficient data in order to design a strategy to counteract these trends. The Congress has consistently blocked efforts to study gun violence as a public health crisis as proposed by a group from Johns Hopkins University.

There are other huge gaps that represent our country’s inadequate response to gun violence. One of the Trump Administration moves after the new president came in was to cancel federal regulations pertaining to making guns less accessible to people with psychiatric problems, as if we needed more mental patients with automatic weapons such as what happened with Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut. Do Trump Administration officials really want to put more automatic weapons in the hands of mental patients by cancelling these regulations?

Recently I wrote to Harford County Sheriff Jeffrey Gahler that much could be learned from the Australian example where gun violence was cut significantly. Gahler’s response was no response. He believes in guns enough to sponsor a gun raffle as part of his campaign to be elected. But for children’s guns safety he should be running a public relations campaign to encourage better prevention in the homes where gun violence is most likely to occur.

Just one less child killed from this accidental violence in the home would be worth the effort.

PHOENIX — The Associated Press and the USA TODAY Network have collaborated on an ongoing project to examine issues related to gun violence in America. The latest installment of the project found that prosecutors across the United States vary widely in deciding whether to bring charges against adults when children get hold of guns and kill themselves or other children.

Here are summaries of accidental fatal shootings in Arizona in recent years in which a child got hold of a gun:

PAYSON:

A 3-year-old boy fatally shot his 1-year-old brother in May 2014 with a handgun that he found in an apartment in Payson.

The shooting occurred when the children and their mother went to get food from the apartment of a neighbor who had helped out them when they were in need. The boys were in a bedroom while the mother filled up boxes of food, and the mother later discovered that the 3-year-old had a .40-caliber handgun.

Before she could say anything, the gun went off, struck the youngest boy in the head and caused him to fall to the ground. He was later pronounced dead while at a hospital, according to police reports.

Three unsecured handguns were hidden in the apartment but weren’t locked up. The gun used in the shooting was believed to have been covered up by a towel.

Prosecutors didn’t bring charges against the neighbor, who was described as a frail 78-year-old man who suffered from dementia or Alzheimer’s. Authorities suggested his condition and the unannounced visit by the family played a role in not bringing charges.

Police said the 3-year-old had no understanding about the shooting and they didn’t believe he even knew what the word “gun” meant.

AVONDALE:

A 5-year-old boy died on September 28 from an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound with an unsecured gun that he found in his family’s Avondale apartment.

Savier Jones was at home with his mother and two siblings when he found the gun in a bedroom.

The 9-mm handgun belonged to the boy’s father, who wasn’t at home at the time of the shooting.

The child’s mother wasn’t in the bedroom at the time. She rushed to her son once she heard gunfire.

Police say they have recommended neglect and endangerment charges against the child’s father for not securing the gun. The recommendation is being reviewed by prosecutors.